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Special

Teachers have always been under appreciated and underpaid and with recent economic issues, getting a job as a teacher has seemed harder than ever. However, studying to become a teacher has proven to take more time in college and require more credit hours. Even more challenging of a career is in Special Education where teachers must work harder to engage and educate children with various disabilities. So why would young adults still pursue this kind of career? For Central Michigan University student, Katie Knopp, the answer to that question is simple:

“ I do what I do because I want to advocate for them because people with special needs don’t get to speak up for themselves,” Knopp said. “They’re people just like you and I. They have the same dreams, needs, and wants and I’m helping them to live without their disability running their life. That’s why do what I do, to help them.”

Knopp’s interest in Special Education comes from a personal place. Her cousin, Maggie, has severe Down syndrome. Through interacting with Maggie, Knopp became very interested in how she adapted and lived her everyday life and developed a passion for working with kids with special needs.

Knopp is currently in her fourth year at CMU studying Special Education, concentrating on Cognitive Impairment with a minor in Adaptive Physical Education. After she graduates in December of 2015, she hopes to return to her hometown to work with the school she interned with during her senior year of high school.

“I would really like to get a job working with more mild to severe disabilities,” Knopp said. “I think I really have the ability to connect with these kids and help them to look past their disabilities.”

The academics at CMU

The Special Education program at CMU is very good with a variety of course topics and opportunities to gain field experience. Knopp mentions that Dr. Judy Chandler and Holly Hoffman were two particularly helpful people during her time at CMU.

“We have some really great professors here,” Knopp said. “[They] really are experienced in the field and do a good job of sharing their experiences with us and letting us learn from mistakes they’ve made and challenges they’ve faced.”

Dr. Chandler has been working with kids with special needs since the late 1970s and is specifically experienced in the area of adaptive physical education, which she teaches at CMU. The class consists of coursework two days a week, and once a week Chandler’s students work with a kids with special needs from the Mount Pleasant community. The students with special needs only get one other time during the week devoted to physical education, so this class allows them a second time to be active which is very important, according to Dr. Chandler.
The adaptive physical education course is also very valuable to the college students. They gain valuable experience working hands-on with individuals ranging from mild to severe disabilities. All CMU students studying physical education are required to take this course even if they were not originally planning to educate in a setting with students with special needs.

“Eventually Michigan will become full inclusion, “ Chandler said. “They will have kids with disabilities that they will have to accommodate in their classrooms.”

Both Chandler and Hoffman agree that there is great value and a great need for people to become special needs educators. There is a really high hiring rate for special education teachers and from CMU as students learn to teach in a variety of settings, Hoffman said.

Tori and Katie

This semester Knopp has been paired up with Tori Blanshan, a 19-year-old girl with severe and very classic autism. Knopp meets with Blanshan for about one hour every Friday to work on her physical skills. They have done things such as bowling, swimming, throwing balls, various station activities, and walking around the track.
Lack of communication is common for kids with autism so working with Blanshan can prove to be difficult at times.

“You can tell her to do something over and over again, but she won’t respond to anything auditory,” Knopp said. “The technique I use is to write on a white board; she can read functionally and that’s how we communicate.”

Knopp’s career goals include teaching physical education in an environment with students with more severe disabilities. She feel’s she can not only help them live without their disability running their lives, while advocating for them in society and to let people know that people with special needs are not so different.

<a href=”https://vimeo.com/94075847″>https://vimeo.com/94075847</a&gt;

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Caregiver/receiver

Caregiver/receiver

Bev Garstecki (left) help her mother Doris Repp into a coat to go to her house for Thanksgiving dinner. Doris has dementia and epilepsy and has recently moved from Pennsylvania to an assisted living home closer to her daughter in Michigan. Although they haven’t always had the best relationship, Bev is now the only family member to see Doris and take care of her on a regular basis.

Patricia (Pat) Spence

Pat Spence pours the rest of her Coke into her coffee cup.

Pat Spence pours the rest of her Coke into her coffee cup.

Pat kisses Daisy, one of three dogs she owns.  "They have fleas, I know they have fleas, but I don't care," she said.

Pat kisses Daisy, one of three dogs she owns. “They have fleas, I know they have fleas, but I don’t care,” she said.

Sandy Barig gives Pat a kiss on the head as a thank you for sharing some Coke to drink.  "I always buy a big pop so I can share some with everybody," Pat said.

Sandy Barig gives Pat a kiss on the head as a thank you for sharing some Coke to drink. “I always buy a big pop so I can share some with everybody,” Pat said.

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A Physical Passion

Jenny Doyel ties her cleats before rugby practice on October 2, 2013.  Doyel has been on Central Michigan’s rugby team since her freshman year in 2009.

Jenny Doyel ties her cleats before rugby practice on October 2, 2013. Doyel has been on Central Michigan’s rugby team since her freshman year in 2009.

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Jenny Doyel passes the rugby ball to teammate Diana Otero, nickname Princess, during practice on October 2, 2013.  “Almost everyone on the team has a nickname,” Doyel said. “It makes it easier to call out each other quickly during a game.”

Jenny Doyel passes the rugby ball to teammate Diana Otero, nickname Princess, during practice on October 2, 2013. “Almost everyone on the team has a nickname,” Doyel said. “It makes it easier to call out each other quickly during a game.”

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Sarah Campbell (left) and Jenny Doyel share a laugh during a tackling exercise at practice on October 2, 2013.

Sarah Campbell (left) and Jenny Doyel share a laugh during a tackling exercise at practice on October 2, 2013.

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Jenny Doyel (middle) watches with her teammates Cecelia Bethuy (kneeling) and Kathleen Considine as their rugby coach, Robert Burns explains a drill during practice on September 30, 2013.

Jenny Doyel (middle) watches with her teammates Cecelia Bethuy (kneeling) and Kathleen Considine as their rugby coach, Robert Burns explains a drill during practice on September 30, 2013.

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Jenny Doyel yells the team cheer during a final huddle at the end of practice on October 7, 2013.

Jenny Doyel yells the team cheer during a final huddle at the end of practice on October 7, 2013.

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It happened one day in the fall of 2009 that Jennifer (Jenny) Doyel realized she waned to play rugby. She was at soccer practice for Central Michigan’s club team on a field right next to where the women’s rugby team was practicing.

“I saw them running and tackling and I thought ‘That looks awesome!’” Jenny said.

After soccer practice that day Doyel went over to talk to the coach to learn what rugby was all about.  She quit the club soccer team and joined the rugby team in 2009 and has been playing ever since.

Doyel’s favorite aspect of rugby is the sportsmanship.

“You get so physical with the other team members, but after it doesn’t matter,” Doyel said. “We always have a social where we get together with the other team after a game to get a bite to eat and hangout.”

Rugby is a full contact sport originating in England in the early 19th century.  Each team plays with 15 players divided into forwards and backs and players are only allowed to pass to a teammate that is behind them on the field.  Doyel plays a back and is the last line of defense.

Doyel has gotten hurt various times throughout her rugby career.  She has had a separated shoulder, stitches near her right eyebrow, and her two front teeth are fake.

“I had to go a few days before I got the teeth fixed,” she said. “I just told everyone that looked at me weird that I play rugby!”

When Doyel isn’t playing rugby or practicing, she is busy with work and school.  She works in the Health Professions building at mission control. Mission control is where all the technology in the building is controlled.  Doyel is responsible for helping people with computer errors and other technology issues.

Doyel is also in the Honors Program at Central Michigan University and is graduating in December.

“Right now I am working on my senior capstone project which keeps me extremely busy,” she said.

 

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Kissinger Farm Family

Steve and Gale Kissinger built their house in 1995. Before, the family lived in a significantly smaller and less-insulated home on the farm. “God truly blessed us with the money to build a new home,” Steve said.

Steve and Gale Kissinger built their house in 1995. Before, the family lived in a significantly smaller and less-insulated home on the farm. “God truly blessed us with the money to build a new home,” Steve said.

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Steve Kissinger feeds two of his 13 horses an apple treat that his wife, Gale Kissinger prepared on Friday Sept. 13 on his farm in Shepard, MI

Steve Kissinger feeds two of his 13 horses an apple treat that his wife, Gale Kissinger prepared on Friday Sept. 13 on his farm in Shepard, MI

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Steve Kissinger wraps up left over string from previous hay bails in the pasture. .  “We started placing hay out in the pasture because as the weather turns colder, the grass doesn’t grow as much out here,” Steve Kissinger explains.

Steve Kissinger wraps up left over string from previous hay bails in the pasture. . “We started placing hay out in the pasture because as the weather turns colder, the grass doesn’t grow as much out here,” Steve Kissinger explains.

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Isaac Smith, Leslie Kissinger’s boyfriend helps unwrap a hay bail during feeding time in the pasture.

Isaac Smith, Leslie Kissinger’s boyfriend helps unwrap a hay bail during feeding time in the pasture.

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Leslie Kissinger shows family friend Paul Terry and his brother Don how to saddle up horses for a trail ride.

Leslie Kissinger shows family friend Paul Terry and his brother Don how to saddle up horses for a trail ride.

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Steve Kissinger hugs his daughter Leslie’s boyfriend, Isaac Smith to thank him for helping with the hay.

Steve Kissinger hugs his daughter Leslie’s boyfriend, Isaac Smith to thank him for helping with the hay.

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